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OBJECTIVES:To investigate the risk of colonization with ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-Ec) in humans in Vietnam associated with non-intensive chicken farming. METHODS:Faecal samples from 204 randomly selected farmers and their chickens, and from 306 age- and sex-matched community-based individuals who did not raise poultry were collected. Antimicrobial usage in chickens and humans was assessed by medicine cabinet surveys. WGS was employed to obtain a high-resolution genomic comparison between ESBL-Ec isolated from humans and chickens. RESULTS:The adjusted prevalence of ESBL-Ec colonization was 20.0% (95% CI 10.8%-29.1%) and 35.2% (95% CI 30.4%-40.1%) in chicken farms and humans in Vietnam, respectively. Colonization with ESBL-Ec in humans was associated with antimicrobial usage (OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.08-5.87) but not with involvement in chicken farming. blaCTX-M-55 was the most common ESBL-encoding gene in strains isolated from chickens (74.4%) compared with blaCTX-M-27 in human strains (47.0%). In 3 of 204 (1.5%) of the farms, identical ESBL genes were detected in ESBL-Ec isolated from farmers and their chickens. Genomic similarity indicating recent sharing of ESBL-Ec between chickens and farmers was found in only one of these farms. CONCLUSIONS:The integration of epidemiological and genomic data in this study has demonstrated a limited contribution of non-intensive chicken farming to ESBL-Ec colonization in humans in Vietnam and further emphasizes the importance of reducing antimicrobial usage in both human and animal host reservoirs.

Original publication

DOI

10.1093/jac/dky506

Type

Journal article

Journal

The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy

Publication Date

03/2019

Volume

74

Pages

561 - 570

Addresses

Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Keywords

Feces, Animals, Chickens, Humans, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli Infections, Zoonoses, beta-Lactamases, Prevalence, Risk Assessment, Carrier State, Genotype, Genome, Bacterial, Animal Husbandry, Adult, Middle Aged, Vietnam, Female, Male, Molecular Epidemiology, Whole Genome Sequencing