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In 1967, it was reported that experimental inoculation of serum from a surgeon (G.B.) with acute hepatitis into tamarins resulted in hepatitis. In 1995, two new members of the family Flaviviridae, named GBV-A and GBV-B, were identified in tamarins that developed hepatitis following inoculation with the 11th GB passage. Neither virus infects humans, and a number of GBV-A variants were identified in wild New World monkeys that were captured. Subsequently, a related human virus was identified [named GBV-C or hepatitis G virus (HGV)], and recently a more distantly related virus (named GBV-D) was discovered in bats. Only GBV-B, a second species within the genus Hepacivirus (type species hepatitis C virus), has been shown to cause hepatitis; it causes acute hepatitis in experimentally infected tamarins. The other GB viruses have however not been assigned to a genus within the family Flaviviridae. Based on phylogenetic relationships, genome organization and pathogenic features of the GB viruses, we propose to classify GBV-A-like viruses, GBV-C and GBV-D as members of a fourth genus in the family Flaviviridae, named Pegivirus (pe, persistent; g, GB or G). We also propose renaming 'GB' viruses within the tentative genus Pegivirus to reflect their host origin.

Original publication

DOI

10.1099/vir.0.027490-0

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Gen Virol

Publication Date

02/2011

Volume

92

Pages

233 - 246

Keywords

Animals, Flaviviridae, Flaviviridae Infections, Hepatitis, Viral, Animal, Hepatitis, Viral, Human, Humans, Monkey Diseases, Phylogeny, Platyrrhini, Terminology as Topic