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OBJECTIVE: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines reduce the prevalence of vaccine serotypes carried in the nasopharynx. Because this could alter carriage of other potential pathogens, we assessed the nasopharyngeal microbiome of children who had been vaccinated with 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein-D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV). METHODS: Profiles of the nasopharyngeal microbiota of 60 children aged 12-59 months, who had been randomized to receive 2 doses of PHiD-CV (n=30) or Hepatitis A vaccine (n=30) 60 days apart, were constructed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of swab specimens collected before vaccination and 180 days after dose 1. RESULTS: Prior to vaccination, Moraxella catarrhalis (median of 12.3% of sequences/subject), Streptococcus pneumoniae (4.4%) and Corynebacterium spp. (5.6%) were the most abundant nasopharyngeal bacterial species. Vaccination with PHiD-CV did not significantly alter the species composition, abundance, or prevalence of known pathogens. Distinct microbiomes were identified based on the abundances of Streptococcus, Moraxella, and Haemophilus species. These microbiomes shifted in composition over the study period and were independent of age, sex, school attendance, antibiotic exposure, and vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccination of children with two doses of PHiD-CV did not significantly alter the nasopharyngeal microbiome. This suggests limited replacement carriage with pathogens other than non-vaccine strains of S. pneumoniae. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov NCT01028326.

Original publication

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0128064

Type

Journal article

Journal

PLoS One

Publication Date

2015

Volume

10

Keywords

Child, Preschool, Corynebacterium, Female, Humans, Infant, Kenya, Male, Microbiota, Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, Nasopharynx, Pneumococcal Vaccines, RNA, Ribosomal, 16S, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Vaccination, Vaccines, Conjugate