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In many high-risk populations, access to tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis and treatment is limited and pockets of high prevalence persist. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of an extensive active case finding program in areas of Cambodia where TB notifications and household poverty rates are highest and access to care is restricted. Thirty operational health districts with high TB incidence and household poverty were randomized into intervention and control groups. In intervention operational health districts, all household and symptomatic neighborhood contacts of registered TB patients of the past two years were encouraged to attend screening at mobile centers. In control districts, routine passive case finding activities continued. The program screened more than 35,000 household and neighborhood contacts and identified 810 bacteriologically confirmed cases. The cost-effectiveness analysis estimated that in these cases the reduction in mortality from 14% to 2% would result in a cost per daily adjusted life year averted of $330, suggesting that active case finding was highly cost-effective.

Original publication

DOI

10.4269/ajtmh.13-0419

Type

Journal article

Journal

Am J Trop Med Hyg

Publication Date

05/2014

Volume

90

Pages

866 - 872

Keywords

Cambodia, Contact Tracing, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Family Characteristics, Humans, Models, Economic, Quality-Adjusted Life Years, Residence Characteristics, Socioeconomic Factors, Tuberculosis