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To gain insight into why antibody responses to malarial antigens tend to be short lived, we studied antigen-specific memory B cells from donors in an area where malaria is endemic. We compared antibody and memory B cell responses to tetanus toxoid with those to 3 Plasmodium falciparum candidate vaccine antigens: the C-terminal portion of merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1(19)), apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1), and the cysteine-rich interdomain region 1 alpha (CIDR1 alpha ) of a protein from the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family. These data are the first to be generated on memory B cells in children who are in the process of acquiring antimalarial immunity, and they reveal defects in B cell memory to P. falciparum antigens. Compared with the results for tetanus toxoid, more donors who were positive for antibody to AMA1 and CIDR1 alpha were negative for memory B cells. These data imply that some exposures to malaria do not result in the establishment of stable populations of circulating antigen-specific memory B cells, suggesting possible mechanisms for the short-lived nature of many anti-malarial antibody responses.

Original publication

DOI

10.1086/429671

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Infect Dis

Publication Date

15/05/2005

Volume

191

Pages

1623 - 1630

Keywords

Adult, Age Factors, Animals, Antibodies, Protozoan, Antigens, Protozoan, B-Lymphocytes, Child, Child, Preschool, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Infant, Malaria, Falciparum, Membrane Proteins, Merozoite Surface Protein 1, Plasmodium falciparum, Protein Subunits, Protozoan Proteins