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Prospective community-based studies have provided fundamental insights into the epidemiology of influenza in temperate regions, but few comparable studies have been undertaken in the tropics. The authors conducted prospective influenza surveillance and intermittent seroprevalence surveys in a household-based cohort in Vietnam between December 2007 and April 2010, resulting in 1,793 person-seasons of influenza surveillance. Age- and sex-standardized estimates of the risk of acquiring any influenza infection per season in persons 5 years of age or older were 21.1% (95% confidence interval: 17.4, 24.7) in season 1, 26.4% (95% confidence interval: 22.6, 30.2) in season 2, and 17.0% (95% confidence interval: 13.6, 20.4) in season 3. Some individuals experienced multiple episodes of infection with different influenza types/subtypes in the same season (n = 27) or reinfection with the same subtype in different seasons (n = 22). The highest risk of influenza infection was in persons 5-9 years old, in whom the risk of influenza infection per season was 41.8%. Although the highest infection risk was in school-aged children, there were important heterogeneities in the age of infection by subtype and season. These heterogeneities could influence the impact of school closure and childhood vaccination on influenza transmission in tropical areas, such as Vietnam.

Original publication

DOI

10.1093/aje/kws121

Type

Journal article

Journal

Am J Epidemiol

Publication Date

15/05/2012

Volume

175

Pages

1062 - 1074

Keywords

Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype, Influenza, Human, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Pandemics, Population Surveillance, Prospective Studies, RNA, Viral, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Risk, Seroepidemiologic Studies, Sex Factors, Tropical Climate, Vietnam, Young Adult