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<ns4:p>Major changes are afoot in the world of academic publishing, exemplified by innovations in publishing platforms, new approaches to metrics, improvements in our approach to peer review, and a focus on developing and encouraging open access to scientific literature and data. The FAIR acronym recommends that authors and publishers should aim to make their output <ns4:bold>F</ns4:bold>indable, <ns4:bold>A</ns4:bold>ccessible, <ns4:bold>I</ns4:bold>nteroperable and <ns4:bold>R</ns4:bold>eusable. In this opinion article, I explore the parallel view that we should take a collective stance on making the dissemination of scientific data <ns4:italic>fair</ns4:italic> in the conventional sense, by being mindful of equity and justice for patients, clinicians, academics, publishers, funders and academic institutions. The views I represent are founded on oral and written dialogue with clinicians, academics and the publishing industry. Further progress is needed to improve collaboration and dialogue between these groups, to reduce misinterpretation of metrics, to reduce inequity that arises as a consequence of geographic setting, to improve economic sustainability, and to broaden the spectrum, scope, and diversity of scientific publication.</ns4:p>

Original publication

DOI

10.12688/f1000research.10318.1

Type

Journal article

Journal

F1000Research

Publisher

F1000 ( Faculty of 1000 Ltd)

Publication Date

05/12/2016

Volume

5

Pages

2816 - 2816